Vehicle Restoration (England)

Framework status: Current (latest) issue

Framework details

Framework ID: FR02525
Issue number: 1
Issued: 13 June 2014

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Vehicle Restoration (England)
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Issued by
Institute of the Motor Industry

Contact name: James Stockdale
Telephone number: 01992 511 521
Please download the framework for email contact information.

Purpose

Defining Apprenticeships

An Apprenticeship is a job with an accompanying skills development programme designed by employers in the sector. It allows the apprentice to gain technical knowledge and real practical experience, along with functional and personal skills required for their immediate job and future career. These are acquired through a mix of learning in the workplace, formal off the job training and the opportunity to practise and embed new skills in a real work context. This
broader mix differentiates the Apprenticeship experience from training delivered to meet narrowly focused job needs.

All apprentices commencing their Apprenticeship must have an Apprenticeship Agreement between the employer and the apprentice. This can be used to reinforce the understanding of the requirements of the Apprenticeship.

On completion of the Apprenticeship the apprentice must be able to undertake the full range of duties, in the range of circumstances appropriate to the job, confidently and competently to the standard set by the industry.


Employer Support for this Apprenticeship

This Apprenticeship framework has been developed by the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC) in partnership with Bicester Heritage, MG Car Club and Bill McGrath, for use within the Vehicle Restoration Maintenance & Repair Sector.

A research report commissioned by the FBHVC and conducted by University of Brighton in 2011 shows that there are 3,800 businesses employing 22,000 people who earn some or all of their living serving the historic vehicle movement and in total the industry itself generates a whopping £4.3 billion a year in the UK. Out of the 22,000 people earning some or all of their living from the industry 12,040 people (43%) are 45 years old or more meaning that a large number of the workforce will be retiring or coming up for retirement in the next 20 years. 380 employers were surveyed as part of the research report and 41% of those employers said that they expect to recruit new staff within the next five years. This means that there is an urgent call to bring new life into the sector or it is at risk of phasing out. Not only does the industry have an ageing workforce, but demand for maintenance and repair of the vehicles is increasing. Research shows that the number of people earning some or all of their living from the industry has increased by 1,000 since 2006 and is on the up. Of the 41% of employers who said they expect to recruit new staff within the next five years 53% of those employers cited that the reason for this was anticipated growth. In total it is estimated that 7,000 new jobs will be required across the industry in the next five years. This means that there is even more demand to bring new life into the industry.

Following the initial research report the FBHVC conducted a second research report themselves into the demand for training in order to bring new life into the sector. 98 classic vehicle restoration employers were surveyed as part of the research report and out of the 98 employers, 92 employers agreed that there was a definite need to create a training programme to bring new life into the industry. Following analysis of the research, it became clear to the FBHVC, that from what employers had said, the most effective way of training new employees into the sector and the most desired route by employers was an Apprenticeship. It is estimated that current demand from employers is 182 apprentices required every year for the next 5 years.


Specific job roles for apprentices

Intermediate Level apprentices (Level 2) will train as Vehicle Restoration Technicians; maintaining, repairing and restoring historic and classic light vehicles and motorcycles.
Advanced Level apprentices (Level 3) will train as Vehicle Restoration Specialist Technicians; specialising in specific areas of maintenance, repair and restoration of  historic and classic light vehicles and motorcycles.

Download framework

Vehicle Restoration (England)
(PDF document 3.41 MB)